Iron Fist

April 3, 2017

(Ep. 84) SR Podcast – April 2017

FOR MATURE AUDIENCES

 April Fools…this isn’t really a podcast post……. so here’s a picture of a Ryan Gosling eating cereal.




…..just kidding….maybe…but i mean just look at that sexy guy eating that cereal.

This month we make our grand return with all sorts of goodies. The fellas belly up to the bar to talk the news and their life failures in “What’s On Tap.”

We’re also in the fighting mood this month and the only way to settle that is another round of “Simplistic Fisticuffs.”

All this, mail order bride talk, trying to remember what the Street Sharks ever did for us, cross-dressing, and all shorts of April shenanigans on The Simplistic Reviews Podcast.


NOTES
MUSIC
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March 22, 2017

Matt’s Take: The State of Marvel’s Netflix Universe

What an age of wonder we continue to live in! Superheroes, Star Wars, Pixar, Marvel, *cough* dc *cough* and so much more. Every comic book, sci-fi, and fantasy nerd is living their wildest dreams with the arms-race continuing at a pace never before seen in modern pop culture. If you dream it, and there is a market for it, it will surely be adapted in some form or another. But are chinks starting to form in the armor of Netflix/Marvel/Disney’s after a pretty rough take on their latest hero, “Iron First.”

Full disclosure, I’ve yet to dive into the newest Netflix Marvel series, “Iron Fist,” but man, based on those reviews, which I normally take more serious then a fortuneteller in a strip mall next to the Chinese Take-Out, there has to be something to them, well, because there are so many bad ones.

But in comparing Season One of “Daredevil” that many people thought pretty much changed the game for Marvel, where are they starting to go wrong after it’s Second Season? Sure, “Jessica Jones” upped the storytelling and introduced the strongest female character that Marvel has put on the screen yet (sorry Black Widowers), but there has been a noticeable drop in consistency.

Perhaps the seasons are a little too long…for me. Some would argue they aren’t long enough, but 13 episodes, with maybe about six of the episodes being of substance and moving the plot along, 10 episodes seem like the way to go.

This brings me to “Luke Cage,’ currently the highest rated Marvel TV show, at least on Rotten Tomatoes, the “be all, end all” of Movie, TV, blah blah blah reviews. As a whole, the show is good. It takes on a lot of issues that scare conservatives and white people, and show that no matter what color you might be, corruption is universal. That might be reaching a little too deep into “Cage” but it does show the social climate of a predominate African-American neighborhood, and is no doubt the most politically charged of the TV MCU so far.

Mike Colter IS Luke Cage. He’s physically imposing, tender at times, but still a reluctant hero who thinks more about his situation than the events happening around him. He’s the anti-thesis to Daredevil in many senses. Whereas Matt Murdock seeks justice and protects his neighborhood, Luke stands on the sidelines and lets his native Harlem fall victim to elected officials and criminals. He knows what he has to do, but prefers to hide and let the neighborhood rip itself apart. Of course, as in most of these superhero origin stories, he sees the error of his ways and with the help of some well-written female characters, and of course the introduction of a villain that can tear his world apart, comes to his senses and decides to save the day.

Unlike “Daredevil” and “Jessica Jones,” this series also lacked an actual villain with a super-powered background. No mind-control or extreme ninja skills with an option to come back from the dead. It was, at first, a fight between a super-strong, yet reluctant hero, and a crime boss, and turned into a super-strong, now active hero, against a crime boss, but now a crime boss is in a super-suit. I do like the re-inclusion of the almost long forgotten Hammer Industries back into the MCU, and it re-opens the doors to maybe get Sam Rockwell back into the mix, which is always welcome.

With the positives, comes the negatives. I really wasn’t a fan of the final fight between Cage and the season’s big bad, Diamonback. It was underwhelming, there just wasn’t much there, and even though some people might think the build up was just enough to give the final fight some pathos, but just fell flat, just like many fights and bad guys in the MCU. To this date, Kilgrave, aka, The Purple Man, is the only villain that really comes to mind that posed a great threat, as well as it being the most personal and tragic.

And while this might make me a traitor to all of my musical sensibilities, considering I love Wu-Tang Clan, I really could have done without the Method Man “freestyle” about Luke Cage during a segment of Sway in the Morning. I don’t know, it seemed so forced and just kind of an out of nowhere element of the show. Now listen, I love Method Man and everything about Wu-Tang Clan, but….why? Why include a musical interlude about Luke Cage in the middle of an episode. No sir, I don’t like it.

Where they’ll go with Season Two of “Luke Cage,” I don’t really know, and will they go the route of releasing the next season before “The Defenders” is finally released, and will the less-than-favorable reviews of “Iron Fist” effect said “Defenders.”

Sure, I haven’t gotten started on “Iron Fist” just yet, but I honestly do feel my enthusiasm waning for these more mature Marvel hero(ines). Yeah, it looks like Frank Castle will be returning sooner rather than later, but just like Roman Times, the crowd is fickle and will boo without mercy if they don’t like something. That, or in fact, “Iron Fist” really is that bad.

People also tell me “Hey, ‘Agents of SHIELD’ has gotten better.” Meh, I’m sure it’s fine, but first impressions are everything, and with the “Winter Solider Oki-Doke,” as I’ll call it, and a character who was as insufferable as Skye (who I also hear got better with time) I pretty much tuned out. I guess what I’m trying to say is that Marvel, TV-wise, has had it’s share of ups-and-downs, and ebbs-and-flows, and should be able to bounce back from a couple of sub-par, ie, not able to meet the lofty expectations of “fans,” outings lately.

What we all need to remember is that while we all waited with bated breath for these Marvel shows to come to Netflix, how high were the hopes for “Daredevil?” I’m sure a lot of people would raise their hands and yell out, “Oh, I knew the whole time!” Puh-lease! After the letdown that was Ben Affleck’s “Daredevil,” and the juggling of show-runners, will you honestly tell me without laughing that you had 100% confidence in Charlie Cox as Matt Murdock and the kid from the Mighty Ducks as his sidekick? You…are a liar.

We were spoiled with “Daredevil” and it ultimately lead to unrealistic notions that everything that Marvel would put on Netflix would be diamonds. This is their first lump of coal, according to “highly qualified” reviewers, but the real test will see how this effects future seasons and the chance that Marvel is willing to take on even more fringe characters. Personally, I’m waiting on Moon Knight, Marvel’s version of Batman pretty much, but it worries me now because of the backlash of “Iron Fist.” Thanks critics, this is why we can’t have nice things…

July 23, 2016

Trailer Hot Take: Luke Cage/Iron Fist

This weekend is San Diego Comic Con, and around this time the floodgates usually open for all sorts of first looks, trailers, news, notes, and general nerd-dom. For fans of Netflix and their Marvel offers, this was a big week with both a trailer for Luke Cage, and a teaser for Iron Fist. Let’s dive in and take a look.

First look at Frankie Faison playing Pop
Ready….
Kick in the door, waving the car door….
THEE SHOT of the trailer
These are so many things to look into this shot, done with great purpose. It’s masterful
Remy “Cottonmouth” Danton
Look at that beauty. With an ODB track on the trailer, and A Tribe Called Quest working the soundtrack….what more could you want from this….
and now….
We don’t know much yet about the adventures of Danny Rand and his kung-fu antics, but here are a few stills from the teaser.
Young Danny with his mom as the plane goes down
Monks….so you know where this is going
Mr. Danny Rand
With these two trailers it finally fills out the roster of The Defenders, which is supposed to premier sometime in 2017. Fun times ahead for all!
April 11, 2015

Simply TV: Daredevil – Season 1 (Of Many Hopefully)

FEARLESS
Due to my work on producing the Simplistic Reviews Podcast, I’ve been limited to only doing written reviews for films or shows that I truly have something to say.  Whether that be for good or for bad.  I’m sure Ultron and friends will get me talking soon along with that Mad guy in the desert.  But honestly my excitement for the show I’m reviewing today actually rivaled my excitement for both of those films combined.  I’m talking about the show about The Man Without Fear…Marvel’s Daredevil Netflix series.  A show that delivers on practically every optimistic hope I had for it and more.  A show that is going to usher in a whole heap more properties from the dark alleys of the MCU.  A show that can be used as a blueprint to make those shows enjoyable without compromising their grit and verve.  A show that takes its material seriously in a dramatic way…not a depressing one.  Daredevil is the show without fear that ironically is scary good. 
To really get into why I like Daredevil so much and why I think it’s one of the smartest moves Marvel has ever done, I think we need to talk about Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. first.  Yes, Marvel fans…I know it has gotten better.  Just hear me out.  When S.H.I.E.L.D. was announced after The Avengers, fans of the MCU rejoiced from the assumption that the TV universe was going to be the perfect petri dish for the more fringe Marvel characters.  A minor league, if you will, for testing out heroes and villains for their inevitable jump to the film universe.  Fleshing out characters on the show, thus circumventing tedious origins stories in the films.  But that wasn’t what we got.  We got a show treading water in order to hide the secrets of Captain America: The Winter Soldier with characters Marvel never intended and still don’t seem to intend on calling up to the majors.  All the steam and residual love from The Avengers film was squandered before that show righted the ship.  And then Marvel made the deal with Netflix.  An outlet not handcuffed by the restrictions of the Disney home network.  An outlet that gives you the freedom and time to tell your story and flesh out more adult themed but popular characters.  Netflix had given Marvel the avenue to do what we wanted S.H.I.E.L.D. to do in its inception.  Flesh out a character…a great character by the way…who has the realistic possibility to be called up to the majors. (Hello Civil War) To be fair to S.H.I.E.L.D., they seem to be doing this method of public introduction of soon-to-be minted characters with the Inhumans storyline.  However, their work and those characters are not going to be as impactful in the long run as a character like Daredevil can be. 
Those of you who don’t know or care about this comic book inside stuff and just want to know what the show is about…let me take off my nerd hat and tell you.  Matt Murdock, the son of a down on his luck boxer, is blinded as a child by some toxic chemicals.  The accident causes his other senses to get heightened astronomically. (Hearing heartbeats, smelling people from long distances, etc.)  Murdock grows up and becomes a lawyer in the gritty New York borough of Hell’s Kitchen, using his abilities to get to the truth out of cases.  But at night…Matt goes out and fights crime as the vigilante known as Daredevil.  Things to take note of for those rolling their eyes thinking, “Not another cliched comic book show.”  
1. Yes, this is connected to the Marvel Cinematic Universe.  But all allusions and references to The Avengers films are inserted more deftly and are there for the story…not just fan service.  (You hear that Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. & Gotham?)
2. Yes, this is a Marvel superhero, but don’t think that he just walks all over his enemies unscathed. Daredevil takes more punishment than any hero you’ve ever seen.  And the damage he takes makes the fights he has have a stronger sense of peril than Thor on the back of a Chitauri Leviathan swooping down Broadway.  
3. You don’t have to know anything about any Marvel film to understand what’s going on.
Props to showrunner Steven DeKnight for weaving this tale and all the MCU elements together as tightly as he does.  He was someone I initially was hesitant about helming this show, mainly due to my disappointment from the loss of the man he replaced, Drew Goddard.  I was wrong to worry.  DeKnight’s love for the character of Matt Murdock is present in every frame of this series.  He knows what he’s doing and utilizes every freedom that Netflix allows him.
The acting is something you’re not getting on S.H.I.E.L.D., or Arrow, or Flash.  It is high quality actors taking the material seriously and really using their talents to ground their characters in a believable and enjoyable way.  Charlie Cox was also someone I was hesitant of initially.  I knew he could act from seeing his performances on Boardwalk Empire and the recent Theory Of Everything.  I just wasn’t sure he could really nail the charm and stubbornly virtuous nature of Matt Murdock.  He does.  I mean seriously, you like him right away.  His likeability and wit and toughness makes you want to follow him on his seemingly impossible mission to clean up his city.  
When DeKnight said he wanted the show to take cues from the HBO show The Wire, I got really excited.  Mainly because I knew what that meant for Wilson Fisk.  Instead of a mustache twirling villain, they were going to fill out the Kingpin of crime as a character.  And they started by making the best casting decision of the show by hiring Vincent D’onofrio.  His Kingpin reminds me a lot of Idris Elba’s Stringer Bell on the aforementioned show The Wire.  He’s a devious man but he is still a man.  A man that you will find yourself sometimes rooting for.  D’onofrio spits in the face of critics who chirp on about Marvel not having good villains.  D’onofrio’s Kingpin as well as Cox’s Daredevil equally deserve a call up to the film universe in the future. (You hear that Spidey?)  Their dynamic here is the heartbeat of the show and that heartbeat is strong.

I am all in on Daredevil because I’m a comic book geek who has been reading his books for years and love how gritty and close to that source material it is while still being original.  But all geekiness aside, Daredevil is a show that is executed very well with great performances and a really compelling story.  People have asked me what is the comic book property I would recommend to wean their non comic book spouses or significant others into the genre.  Daredevil is easily at the top of that discussion.  It’s a great comic book show…but it’s a great show in general first.  Hopefully, his Netflix follow ups Jessica Jones, Luke Cage, and Iron Fist hit the mark as accurately and hard as this.  Wrap your fists, get up off that mat, have your blind attorney present, watch it, then tell me I’m wrong.
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