Killer Klowns From Outer Space

October 30, 2017

(Ep. 93): Killer Klowns from Outer Space – Movie Commentary: October 2017

Killer Klowns from Outer Space

PG-13  1988 ‧ Science fiction film/Cult film ‧ 1h 28m

When teenagers Mike (Grant Cramer) and Debbie (Suzanne Snyder) see a comet crash outside their sleepy small town, they investigate and discover a pack of murderous aliens who look very much like circus clowns. They try to warn the local authorities, but everyone assumes their story is a prank. Meanwhile, the clowns set about harvesting and eating as many people as they can. It’s not until they kidnap Debbie that Mike decides it’s up to him to stop the clowns’ bloody rampage.
Release date: May 20, 1988 (USA)

What could be better then watching some Killer Klowns this Halloween!? Well with the Simplistic Reviews crew! Join us as we watch a movie that was made to be wacky and goof, yet its still better then half the shit that comes out today! So grab that frankenberry! Pour some of that Halloween themed choice of beer because… this Movie Commentary is gonna scare your socks off!


March 6, 2015

Clown

Clown – Myths

Say what you want about Eli Roth, but just when you think he’s disappeared into obscurity, he always finds a way back into a cinephile’s consciousnesses. Sure, he’s not the best filmmaker, and not even the best horror filmmaker, but for some reason when I see his name attached to a project I feel compelled to watch. With that being said, this brings me to Eli Roth Presents (?) “Clown.” While not a great film, there are still some really cool ideas in the film and adds to the myths we all know and probably fear from our childhoods, if you are, in fact, scared of clowns.

Our tales begins with kids at a birthday party eagerly awaiting the arrival of a clown. Loving mother Meg receives a call shortly after that the clown they are waiting for has been double-booked and can’t make the party. Meg calls her realtor husband, Kent, and delivers the bad news, but Kent has other plans. Fortune smiles upon Kent when he finds an old clown suit in a chest…hidden away of course. The party goes off without a hitch, and Dummo the Clown is the hero of the day. Things begin to get weird when Kent can’t remove the costume, wig, or clown nose. Things gets even weirder when he meets Karlsson, played by resident Swedish weirdo Peter Stormare. Needless to say, Kent is cursed to wear the suit until he takes the lives of five children as he slowly turns into something that isn’t quite human.

The fear of clowns trope has been one of horror’s go to tropes for years. You can go to “Stephen King’s It” for the best example of the evil clown. Personally, my first experience with clowns was “Killer Klowns From Outer Space” which is a goofier and more light-hearted take on the evil clown. “Clown” is far more earnest than “Killer Klowns” not to mention several other recent clown films that pretty much make the killer a clown, or clown-like being, that uses goofy ways to dispatch their quarry.

What sets this film apart from other films of it’s ilk, is, again, its earnestness. It doesn’t try to be goofy just to be goofy, it’s actually a very nicely paced horror film that takes the creepiness of clowns and creates an interesting mythic story. Essentially this clown is Pennywise from “It” if you took away all the humor and replaced it with gore and horror. The biggest gripe that I have, however, is the third act, which pretty much falls into the typical “killer in the house” cliché. There is also the occasional use of CG blood, which always sticks in my craw, but its used sparingly enough to be tolerable.

One of the highlights of the film is one scene specifically that is few reminiscent of “Alien.” It takes place in the plastic tunnels of a Chuck E Cheese playground and provides a great deal of suspense. Another aspect of the film that might be overlooked is the sound design and score. The stomach rumblings of Kent throughout the film are very unnerving, and the score by Matt Veligdan sounds like a re-purposed John Harrison score, but it’s subtle and adds to the tension.

All in all, “Clown” is a fun watch, but it isn’t perfect. It suffers from some overused horror tropes and it gets dragged down in its own ridiculousness at times, but its a good take on the killer clown genre that doesn’t rely on “a vengeful ghost or deranged-mental-patient-in-a-clown-suit.”

Fun Fact: One of the earliest ideas of the “evil clown” comes from “Hop-Frog” a short story written by Edgar Allen Poe in 1849.

August 8, 2012

Killer Klowns From Outer Space

 Killer Klowns From Outer Space – Memories

I remember as a kid waking up early one morning before anyone in the house and taking advantage of the one TV that we had with HBO.  I turn the TV and one movie was just ending and the credits were just closing out.  I decided to wait and see what was coming up next and the next thing I hear is some faint circus music with what it seemed people laughing.  Next thing I know the credits flash on the screen, the guitars kick in and I see ‘Killer Klowns From Outer Space.”  With that, what I thought of b-movies would never be the same.

Most people have fears of clowns, personally I don’t get it, but yes, its real.  In “Killer Klowns” the plot is simple, and creepily effective.  A group of jolly klowns have come from some undisclosed planet to bring the citizens of Crescent Cove the chuckles, and promptly kill them in some quite humorous ways, ranging from killer popcorn to corrosive pies.

A lot of b-movies hold special places in my heart from “The Toxic Avenger” (which I will cover in another review) to “Sorority Babes in the Slimeball Bowl-o-Rama” (which I will cover in yet another review down the road).  I remember watching many of these fine films on either “Monstervision” with Joe Bob Briggs, “USA’s ‘Up All Night‘” with either Gilbert Gottfried or Rhonda Shear, and to a lesser degree, “Night Flight.”  Whenever I think about “Klowns” it takes me back to a simpler time when I wasn’t so worried about what I might be getting out of a movie, and instead just enjoying myself.

Fun Fact:  Coulrophobia is the fear of clowns with the prefix, -coulro, meaning “stilt walker” derived from Ancient Greek.

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