NBA

April 11, 2017

The Heat is On! Matt’s Top Ten Miami Heat Players

Many of you might know that DJ and I are Miami Heat fans. And no, we aren’t these Heat fans:

As a whole. we are just some of the worst. But you take the good and the bad, and my philosophy remains that all fans of teams are the worst. Fan is short for fanatics, take it like that. Sure, there are several people that love their team and simply just like to express it by dressing like their young children in backwards hats, jerseys, maybe some awesome sunglasses with the team name across the frames, and so on and so forth. But, hey, I’ve drunken yelled about hating Paul Pierce and Rajon Rondo before at a Heat game. Thanks Gray Goose (oh wow, I just realized how dickish that sounds).

With another season ending, I had little hope this year, especially when you are seeing a team with an 11-30 record. But low and behold, for the first time in a long time, the final game of the Heat’s season is actually going to mean something. Playoffs or Nothing. As a follower of the Heat (I won’t use the term fan, because I hate it) that’s exciting, that’s intriguing, that’s something that I missed before the days of the Big Three, and I honestly haven’t felt this way with the Heat since maybe 2003 or 2004.

I remember starting to get into basketball around 1993 or 1994. Of course everyone loved Jordan, but I liked seeing Shaq and Penny up in Orlando, and it was probably around 1995 or 1996 when I really started watching the Heat. I mean you had Tim Hardaway, Alonzo Mourning, Dan Majerle. Add in the play-by-play of Dr. Jack Ramsay, and it was Magic in Miami.

So let’s take some time to remember some of the greats that came through Miami. Keep in mind, this is a list of players that I appreciated, not necessarily the ones that caused people to wake up, drive to Sports Authority (RIP) and buy a bunch of iron-on basketball jerseys and fitted caps.

10. Rafer Alston

Skip 2 My Lou will always be one of my favorites, even though he wasn’t the best point guard in Heat history (spoiler, there are going to be a lot of PGs on this list). Alston was a risky pickup since he was only really known for his work on the ‘And 1 Mixtape’ circuit, but during a transitional period for the Heat in 2004, he was one of several things that I loved about the 2003-2004 Miami Heat team.


9. PJ Brown
Brown was the Heat’s Udonis Haslem before Udonis Haslem. Oh, plus he flipped Charlie Ward upside down during a game in 1998. He had a sweet little jump shot and he was just an overall good player. The Heat’s version of Charles Oakley if you will

8. Jason Williams

Sure, we got White Chocolate at the tail end of his career, but like Alston, he brought an element of fun to the Heat that was being built for a championship run after the acquisition of Shaquille O’Neal after Anthony Carter forgot to send in paperwork for his contract extension. So, maybe by proxy Anthony Carter should be my favorite Heat player of all time because of his Butterfly Effect-type blunder. Williams was great though, and he still showed some of his vintage Kings swag in route to the Heat’s first championship in 2006.

7. Bruce Bowen
Bruce Bowen played defense, hit 3-pointers, but couldn’t hit free throws. Who’d of thought? Bowen was another tough guy that didn’t take any shit from anyone, plus he karate kicked people in the face during games. He didn’t stick around very long with the Heat, but Bowen played tough on a tough Heat team that was almost good enough to win a championship if the chips fell in the right place.
6. Chris Bosh
Dwyane Wade and LeBron James were the draws during their time in Miami, but Bosh always seemed to be the most down to Earth guy on the team in a time of stars. He likes beer, dresses spiffy, and just seems like a genuine guy. Sure, lately it’s been a rocky ride with his health that likely soured his relationship with the Heat, but that doesn’t take away all he’s done for the organization. Bosh-asaurus Lives!
5. Tim Hardaway
Tim Hardaway did it all. He ran the court, hit big shots, and was part of some of the best Heat teams to never win a championship. The Killer Crossover is still the stuff of legends and between him and Alonzo Mourning, they were the best 1-2 Punch in the mid-to-late 90s. And those Heat-Knicks series’; nothing better.
4. Dan Majerle
My love affair with the mid-90s Heat continues with none other than Thunder Dan himself. Majerle was one of those players who hit big shots, but when he drove to the hoop for a dunk you would jump out of your skin because, I guess, it was surprising to see an unassuming white guy do it. In a time with emotional players like Mourning and Hardaway, Majerle was one of those players that kept their cool and just played the game. Listen to any call with Dr. Jack when Majerle would hit a three and you might have a religious experience. THUNDER!
3. Alonzo Mourning
It took two tenures with the Heat to win that title, but dammit he did it! During the 2006 title run, Zo was a huge reason, especially on the defensive end, why the Heat were able to come back and pry the championship away from the Dalla Mavericks. A lot of people might blame the refs, but guess what; F*ck Off. Anywho, Mourning was the major reason the Heat became a team to watch in the 90s, and he continues to be an ambassador for the team. Plus, he was “almost” able to “fight” Larry Johnson while Jeff van Gundy was hanging onto his ankle like your clingy ex-girlfriend who want’s their hair dyer back.
2. Udonis Haslem
The guy tattooed the state of Florida on his back. What else do you need to know about Haslem. Yeah, once he got rid of his cornrows his career kind of went downhill, but that doesn’t take away him coming from a long time of Heat enforcers like PJ Brown and Bruce Bowen. Plus, he’ll likely go down as the lone, true, “Heat Lifer.”
1. Dwyane Wade
There could really only be one. Wade will go down as the best player in Heat history, and one of the best players in NBA history. Yes, things ended very sour as he claimed to be a “Heat Lifer” yet left a team he helped build and win three titles with. You can blame Wade, you can blame the organization, you can even blame Lebron James for being the focus of a team that once was Wade’s. It turned ugly when Wade left, at least for me, since I felt a bit betrayed, but I’m sure that’s just one of the steps of grieving as seeing one of the best players leave your team after watching his entire career in the same uniform. Nevertheless, three titles, game-winning shots, epic moments. The good times, the bad times, seeing Wade play was a complete roller coaster of emotions. I’m also not one of those Wade “fans” over Heat “fans.” I’m Heat first, Wade second, even if that margin is razor thin. He was the Heat’s Michael Jordan, the Lakers’ Kobe Bryant, the Celtics’ Bill Russell, he was the Heat’s first franchise player, and that makes him Numbero Uno!
March 16, 2015

Slaughter Film Presents: Action Movie Time Machine – Double Team

Well it’s March, and with it comes March Madness. To honor the basketball gods, we will be loading up the “Action Movie Time Machine” with the dial set to the decedent year of 1997 to visit Dennis Rodman, before he became the American ambassador to North Korea.
The year is 1997. Howard Stern showed everyone his “Private Parts”, police investigate the murder of the Notorious B.I.G., and the Bundy family say goodbye as “Married With Children” comes to an end. All this, and someone thought it was a good idea to put NBA star Dennis Rodman in “Double Team”.
THE SKINNY
Jack Quinn, Jean-Claude Van Damme, is a special forces spy type who has recently retired so he can be with his wife when she gives birth to their first child. His retirement plans get cut short as he is sent out on one last mission to apprehend an international terrorist for hire who goes by the name Stavros, Mickey Rourke. Quinn has spent years trying to capture Stavros, so naturally, when Stavros comes out of hiding, Quinn is just the man for the job.
Quinn is sent to lead a Delta team in the capture of Stavros, but first we have to introduce the elephant in the room. Quinn visits the gay-bar district of town to meet up with his contact, Yaz, Dennis Rodman. Yaz, is interesting. He…well, is dressed like Dennis Rodman. Dennis Rodman is more or less playing himself in this movie. In fact, Dennis Rodman is playing Dennis Rodman pretending to be an underground arms dealer who has recently decided to work exclusively with the “good guys”. This scene isn’t so important. It simply introduces his character so we’re familiar with him later.
So, Quinn buys some weapons, that apparently the Delta Team can’t get their hands on, and he and the Deltas head after Stavros.
Their intelligence says that Stavros will be visiting a Dutch amusement park. The Delta team show up early and set up a sting operation complete with a tranquilizing sniper who will take Stavros alive. When he arrives, Quinn wonders why he would bother with an amusement park? Is he planning a terrorist attack? Well it turns out that he was visiting his son.
Soon the Deltas are discovered, a shoot out begins and Stavros’ son is shot in the cross fire. Quinn chases Stavros on foot and is lead to a nearby hospital where they fight it out in the nursery. Stavros manages to escape when he  throws a grenade at Quinn. Quinn opts for saving the children and this allows Stavros to go free.
When Quinn wakes up from the explosion he finds himself on a remote island as the newest member of “The Colony”. The Colony is where special agents go when why are no longer effective. They are too dangerous to be set free and too valuable to kill. Instead they are gathered together to analyze data and help world governments capture terrorists and fight rogue nations. This idea is a 100% rip-off of a ’60s British television series called The Prisoner.
After a few days and two training montages, Quinn fights his way off the island and swims through laser infested waters before being picked up by a cargo plane that Quinn climbs into in mid-air. Once on the ground, he recruits the help of Yaz who offers to take him to see his wife – who thought Quinn was dead. I don’t know why they didn’t just drive, but Quinn and Yaz parachute into Quinn’s backyard inside an invention Yaz came up with himself. It’s a giant air filled globe the encases the person wearing it, allowing them to safely float down to the surface of the Earth…It’s a fuckin’ basketball!
Anyhow, once Quinn arrives at his house, he discovers that it’s a trap set by Stavros. Stavros has kidnapped Quinn’s pregnant wife and is planning to take the child for himself to replace the one killed in the shoot out. Yeah, that’ll teach Quinn!
Quinn and Yaz follow the Stavros trail to Italy where Yaz uses his monk connections to zero in on him. “Monk connections”, you ask? Yep, apparently a while back Yaz built the monk’s some “main frame processor” complete with a dial-up connection to the world wide web. The “cyber-monks” are grateful and most eager to repay Yaz.
The monks help Quinn locate his wife, who is at a hospital giving birth. By the time Quinn arrives, the baby has been hatched and Stavros is gone. Fortunately one of the nurses knows his plans.
Quinn follows Stavros to the Coliseum where he and Yaz must fight through Stavros’ goons before Quinn and Stavros fight it out surrounded by land mines. If that wasn’t enough, Stavros brought along a bangle tiger. Stavros sure knows how to party.
Yaz saves the baby while Quinn and  Stavros battle – which is a pretty decent fight sequence. Everything ends when Stavros steps on one of his own land mines – blowing up both himself, the tiger and the entire arena…for some reason. When all is said and done, Quinn rides off into the night with his newborn son. The End.
THE VERDICT
I feel like “Double Team” was the precursor to “Rush Hour”. I might be giving “Double Team” more credit than it deserves but each film shares quite a bit with the other. They each team-up a martial marts master with a wisecracking black man… Okay, that the only similarity. But “Double Team” did come out over a year before “Rush Hour”. And if movies like “Deep Impact” & “Armageddon”, “Dante’s Peak” & “Volcano”, and “White House Down” & “Olympus Has Fallen” are any indication that studios are totally willing to rip of each others idea while are still being developed, I’m sure the same could be said about “Double Team” & “Rush Hour”.
“Double Team” is kind of…bad. But there is good to be found within it. Like Van Damme’s fighting…and splits. There are many of the action sequences that are well filmed and turn out to be pretty entertaining. My problems with the film is also the action sequences. While they are entertaining, they are designed to be so over the top that I can’t take them seriously. They are so overly complicated that they stop making sense. These problems really show the films age, as everything in the ’90s had to be the most extreme at all costs. Example; The final showdown that results in a hand to hand fight to the death…in the Coliseum…surrounded by land mines…and there’s a tiger. Are you fucking kidding me?!
Rodman is another problem. So naturally, to help sell the film the studio wanted an interesting celebrity. He dressed outlandish and fooled around with Pamela Anderson and this made him famous.  And now we have a sub-par action flick that’s full of his strange outfits and colorful hair-dos. His popularity was a bit of a passing fad, and again, this movie shows it’s age. Oh, and everything Rodman says becomes a cheesy basketball related one-liner.
My REAL problem with this movie is it’s story telling. There is no attention to detail and no effort to develop the characters. Van Damme’s character is a special forces spy type, but who does he work for? Why does Rodman’s character so chummy with Italian monks and why do the monks have the internet? I could go on asking these dumb questions but I won’t bother. It seemed like the writers had a hand full of “awesome” ideas and had to find a way to get them all to fit together without wasting too much time on explaining anything.
In the end, the core of this movie is interesting; how the spies have a lose network they belong to and when the “retire” they go to The Colony – but everything else is gimmicky crap.
I’m Cory Carr and this concludes another trip on the “Action Movie Time Machine”. Until next time, Semper Fi Punk!
For more from Cory, check out his website slaughterfilm.com, where he and his good friend Forest Taylor record weekly podcasts, reviewing the films that are legendary, even in Hell!

 

 
 

 
 

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