Pulp Fiction

December 30, 2012

The Simplistic Reviews Podcast: December 2012

You’ve all been clamoring for it, well here it is.  The Simplistic Reviews Podcast for December 2012!  In this sophomore edition we dig into the holiday season with what made us happy in the cinema during 2012.  From “The Dark Knight Rises” to the re-release of “Pulp Fiction” we touch it all, and not in that inappropriate way….okay, just over the pants, but give us a break.
We also give AMC, Nerds, “The Vow”, and British -Voiced Nazis a hard time in our newest segment, “Sincerely.”

All this and more on The Simplistic Reviews Podcast for December 2012.

Click on the link below to download the podcast and enjoy folks!

FOR MATURE AUDIENCES ONLY.
 

Show Notes:

 Click HERE to listen to podcast

Check us out on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest

December 13, 2012

Happy Holidays: Pulp Fiction

Pulp Fiction – Coolest

Okay, you’re the new kid on the block, you just wowed people in Sundance and Cannes with “Reservoir Dogs,” you completed a script for “True Romance” and worked on a script with Oliver Stone for “Natural Born Killers.”  What do you do next if you’re Quentin Tarantino?  Well, you help resurrect John Travolta’s career, create a film that will change cinema forever, and turn Samuel L. Jackson into a Hollywood leading man (of sorts).  You simply create “Pulp Fiction,” for my money, the coolest film ever made.

To create the coolest film ever, you have to start with a cast, and “Fiction” gives a Woody Allen movie a run for its money cast-wise.  From Eric Stoltz, to Christopher Walken, and everyone in-between, you could say that everyone in this film gives the performances of their lives.  No one is mailing it in, and while some of the dialogue might come off a bit hokey and a little too noir-ish, the actors are giving it with conviction and believability.

To keep the cool factor going, you have to know you’re genre, and in Tarantino’s case, he uses every genre he’s ever loved and it shows.  You have blaxploitation, exploitation, french new wave, action, rape-revenge, buddy movie, the list can go on and on.  While you can call “Pulp” a drama film, I’d almost like to call it a homage to the essence of film.  It’s the best of what the genre can be in a tight 2 hour and 50 minute package.

As a side note, as much as people look into the film for it’s religious undertones, (Marcellus Wallace is the Devil, and Vincent and Jules are sent to get his soul back) get off of that already.  At the roots, “Pulp” is a grindhouse film at its best, and looking for deeper meaning in a grindhouse film is like looking for a virgin in the Catholic Church.  Get off your high horse cinephiles, for all we know it’s Wallace’s dirty laundry in the briefcase and it’s yellow because he pissed all over it.  Boom!  Mystery solved.

As for the plot of “Pulp” it goes a little like this.  Two hitman, Vincent and Jules, are sent by their boss, Marcellus Wallace, to procure a package from four men in an apartment.  Needless to say things get bloody, and both Vince and Jules need to lay low and dispose of a headless corpse in a trunk.  The plot moves to a series of vignettes that involve Vince, a boxer named Butch, played by Bruce Willis (I would also call this film a comeback of sorts for Willis as well) and a date with Vince and Wallace’s wife, Mia.  Needless to say, things don’t go so well with that either.  Moving along Butch pulls a fast one on Wallace when he doesn’t throw a boxing match in which Wallace loses a great deal of cash.  While Butch plots his escape from Los Angeles he gets sidetracked in the search for his missing gold watch.  Not to sound like a broken record but things turn sour for Vince, Butch, and Wallace himself.  Just like Tarantino’s previous outing, “Reservoir Dogs” the story is told in a non-linear fashion that keeps you guessing and even when characters meet their end you still end up seeing them again.

While many call “Pulp” the best film in Tarantino’s repertoire; it’s a tough call for me.  It’s groundbreaking in the development of indie cinema throughout the 1990s, and proved that good writing can be both dramatic, smart, cheesy, and funny as hell, but I’ll cover my favorite film of his in a future review.  Tarantino turned the mundane conversations of what they call Whoppers in Paris into high art and created a cultural zeitgeist.  He turned the inhuman into people that we can relate to, and while there is a good amount of violence in “Pulp” it never feels gory or overdone in a way that seems unneeded to move the story along.

You know how when you were a kid and you would tell someone “Hey, if you looked up the definition of stupid you’d find a picture of you next to it.”  Well, if you looked up coolest you would find a picture of Samuel L Jackson holding a 9mm with Tarantino standing behind him like a proud parent.

Fun Fact:  Recognize who played the waiter Buddy at Jack Rabbit Slims?  Well, that was Steve Buscemi, who played Mr. Pink in “Reservoir Dogs.”

October 27, 2012

31 Nights of Halloween, Silent Hill: Revelation

Silent Hill: Revelation –Lifeless

Video games have had a rough history in cinema.  Aside from maybe “Tron,” video games and movies are like oil and waterThe problem is that studios try to pander to the people that play the games as opposed to an entire film audience.  I liken it to an inside joke where the people that get the joke love it and everyone else is left scratching their heads.  That’s how “Silent Hill: Revelation” is, in addition to being a lifeless sequel that probably came five years too late.

I’ll preface with what I’m about to unleash on “Revelation” with this; I like the “Silent Hill” franchise.  When the first game came out on PlayStation it was atmospheric, creepy, and the plot was relatively coherent.  That continued into the first sequel with more back-story given to the city of Silent Hill, but the game started to fizzle after that.  The first “Silent Hill” film had some good ideas and a decent writing and directing combo, Roger Avary of “Pulp Fiction” and “The Rules of Attraction” fame and Christophe Gans, who directed the underrated “Brotherhood of the Wolf,” respectively.  Neither have anything to do with “Revelation” and it shows, you can tell that the studio is simply out to make money and pander to hardcore “Silent Hill” fans that still think the franchise is relevant.

The plot, if you can call it that, revolves around Heather Mason, aka, Sharon Da Silva from the first film.  Heather, and her father Harry Mason, played by Sean Bean, are on the run from a mysterious evil looking for Heather.  At some point Harry is kidnapped and taken to Silent Hill and Heather, along with Vincent, Kit Harington from “Game of Thrones,” venture into the darkness.  What plays out is pretty much what you would expect;  there are freaky monsters, including the iconic “Pyramid Head,” a moment where all hope seems lost, and finally our heroes riding off into the sunset, escaping Silent Hill.  I’ll tell you what; go find “Silent Hill 3” in the bargain bin for your PlayStation 2 (or even Xbox 360 at this point), play it, and I assure that you’ll have a better time.

“Revelation” tries to build on the mythology of the first film, but it comes off as a slow burn with music and jump scares that come off dated.  Its not a bad film, but it certainly isn’t a good film either.  However, I will say that Adelaide Clemens (who has to be the love child of both Carey Mulligan and Michelle Williams) is the splitting image of her video game counterpart, but some of the other characters……ugh.  Bean is mailing it in despite his limited screen time, and the once great Malcolm McDowell is at his hammiest, even outdoing his performances in the Rob Zombie Halloween remakes.

Will there be another addition to the “Silent Hill” film franchise?  I hope not.  I will admit that I was excited to see “Revelation,” but it ended up being just like the scary nurses….lifeless.  Oh I nearly forgot, I didn’t bother to see this in 3D either, there is no reason for 3D in modern cinema.  It was cool in the 1950s when giant insects were attacking us, but it’s time to grow up and take off those silly glasses.  You look like this guy, and that’s scarier than “Silent Hill: Revelation.”

Fun Fact:  The high school Heather attends is All Hallows High.  Halloween is also called All Hallows Eve.  Freaky. 

October 21, 2012

Simplistic Reviews Presents: Word Association

The second feature for the upcoming Simplistic Reviews Podcast proves that all you need to make a great game show is a simple concept, catchy music, and a rather unorthodox announcer.  Welcome to Word Association.

Welcome to the new home of SimplisticReviews.net - We're currently still working on the site. You might notice a few issues, please be patient with us. Thanks! (Store also in testing — no orders shall be fulfilled.)
Scroll to top